Flower Analysis Worksheet

(Flowers 1-4)

1. Meadowsweet

meadowsweet, Spiraea latifolia

This flower was found here: In a plant garden on Iuka Ave. An open, meadow-type area.

It is on page 310 in Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide.

Common name meadowsweet  Scientific name: Spiraea latifolia

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate or  fused? separate

Calyx:    number of sepals 5 separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens many; maybe 30 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, or syncarpous: apocarpus

Flower type/ovary position: hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: The flowers are so small and clumped together that they look like a flower lace.

2. Virginia Rose

Virginia rose, Rosa virginiana

This flower was found here: In a plant garden on Iuka Ave. An open, meadow-type area.

It is on page 316 in Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide.

Common name Virginia Rose  Scientific name: Rosa virginiana

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate or  fusedseparate

Calyx:    number of sepals separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 10 I think (hard to count even with lens) separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, or syncarpous: apocarpus

Flower type/ovary position: hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: Their leaves are more sharply toothed than other roses.

3. Pink turtlehead

Pink turtlehead, Chelone lyoni

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This flower was found here: In a slightly shaded, meadow area in Iuka park

It is on page 94 in Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide.

Common name Pink turtlehead  Scientific name: Chelone lyoni

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate or  fusedfused

Calyx:    number of sepals separate or fused? fused

Adroecium: number of stamens 4 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, or syncarpous: syncarpous

Flower type/ovary position: hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? zygomorphic (bilateral)

Additional distinctive features: The fused petals of the flower leave such a small opening that the flower looks like an oval or turtlehead according to Wild Flower.org.

4. Cardinal Flower

Cardinal flower, Lobelia cardinalis

This flower was found here: In a meadow area in Iuka park

It is on page 52 in Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide.

Common name Cardinal flower  Scientific name: Lobelia cardinalis

Corolla:  number of petals 5 separate or  fusedseparate, or maybe partially fused

Calyx:   number of sepals separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 5 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? fused

Gynoecium type: It seems to be unicarpellate, but I am unsure and can not find confirmation

Flower type/ovary position: epigynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic (bilateral)

Additional distinctive features: The petals are in fact fused and actually form into and upper and bottom lip with two and three lobes respectively. (Looked up here: U.S. Forest Service)

 

Wildflower Identification

(Flowers 5-8)

5. Spotted Touch-Me-Not

Spotted touch-me-not, Impatiens capensis

This Flower was also found in a meadow area in Iuka park. It is called the spotted touch-me-not, Impatiens capensis, and became my favorite plant as a child, a recognition that it still holds today. The reason for this, and also its name, is because when its seed pods are ripe, They will explode upon any contact. Some of the seed pods of this plant were in perfect condition for this (as seen in the image) when I found them last Saturday. Additionally, they have a really weird flower structure and it seems like they are upside down as the cone shape opens towards the pedicel.

6. Mistflower

This flower was found in a more shaded, wooded area of Iuka park. It is called a Mistflower, Eupatorium coelestinum and is a beautiful plant, but so tiny that it is easy to miss. As seen in the image, the sepals are easier to see than any other part of the flower, which is different than any of the others that I found.

7. Jumpseed/ Virginia Knotweed

Jumpseed, Tovara virginiana

This Flower was also found in a meadow area in Iuka park. It is called Jumpseed or Virginia knotweed, Tovara virginiana. The flowers at this stage look like miniature onions with one pistil that spilts into two parts sticking out.

8. Wild hydrangea

Wild hydrangea, Hydrangea arborescens

This flower was found in the most open meadow area of any of the flowers in Iuka park. It is called a wild hydrangea, Hydrangea arborescens. It seems to me as if the plant has a waterfall of flowers coming out of a given area in a beautiful fashion. It makes sense that this flower is so popular for gardens.